5 Times You Really, Seriously Need to Go to the ER

Think about: A heart attack. Everyone knows that crushing chest pain is a hallmark of a heart attack. But that shouldn’t be the only symptom on your radar. Signs can be more subtle in women than in men, says Heather Rosen, MD, medical director of UPMC Urgent Care in North Huntingdon, Penn. As a result, young women tend to brush off early symptoms and avoid seeking help, sometimes mistaking the pain of a heart attack for indigestion or acid reflux. Watch out for uncomfortable pressure in your chest (not necessarily in the middle—and not everyone experiences this), as well as non-chest pain symptoms, such as discomfort in one or both arms, nausea or dizziness, which are more common in women, per a study in JAMA Internal Medicine. Cold sweats, shortness of breath, and pain in the back, neck, shoulder, or jaw are other possible symptoms. 


What to do: Anytime you suspect a heart attack, “err on the side of caution and call 911,” advises Dr. Rosen. Once the ambulance arrives, the paramedics can perform an EKG and give you aspirin or another treatment en route to the hospital. Don’t go to urgent care or your family doctor; they won’t be able to run the necessary tests to evaluate your heart. 

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